Twilight

Twilight

C.R.W. Nevinson, English, 1889-1946
1916
Drypoint on paper

Known for his bleak and graphic depictions of World War I, C. R. W. Nevinson worked as a painter and printmaker throughout his career. Nevinson began his artistic training in 1908 at St. John’s Wood School of Art, and enrolled at the Slade School of Fine Art in London the following year. His visit to the Sackville Gallery’s 1912 Futurist exhibition inspired him to start working in that manner. His connection with the Italian Futurists and especially their leader, the poet and editor Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, was cemented with their jointly written manifesto, “Futurism and English Art” (1914). But in marked contrast to the Futurists’ heroicizing approach to World War I, Nevinson increasingly utilized this style to capture the war’s horror and devastation. As an ambulance driver for the Red Cross and, later, as an official war artist for the British government, Nevinson developed a visual vocabulary focused on military combat and its aftermath. Abandoning Futurism in 1919, Nevinson concentrated on naturalistic urban scenes until ceasing his printmaking practice in 1932. His autobiography, Paint and Prejudice, was published in 1937 as a memoir primarily of his experiences as an artist during the Great War.

Leave a Reply